Theodore Dalrymple: False Apology Syndrome– I’m sorry for your sins.

October 8, 2008

In Character:

There is a fashion these days for apologies: not apologies for the things that one has actually done oneself (that kind of apology is as difficult to make and as unfashionable as ever), but for public apologies by politicians for the crimes and misdemeanours of their ancestors, or at least of their predecessors. I think it is reasonable to call this pattern of political breast-beating the False Apology Syndrome.

Mr. Blair, the then British prime minister, apologized to the Irish for the famine; one of the first public acts of Mr. Rudd, the Australian prime minister, was to apologize to the Aborigines for the dispossession of their continent; Pope John Paul II apologized to the Muslims for the Crusades. There are many other examples, and there are also demands for apologies by aggrieved, or supposedly aggrieved, groups.

What is this all about, and what does it signify? Does it mean that at long last the powerful are making a genuine effort to see things from the point of view of the weak, or is it, on the contrary, a form of moral exhibitionism that subverts genuine moral thought and conduct?

Let us examine briefly the apology for the Crusades as an example of the whole genre. It is not exactly a new discovery that the Crusaders often, perhaps usually or even always, behaved very badly. It is not in the nature of invading armies to behave well, even when discipline is strong, morale is high, and control of the foot soldiers is firm; it is no secret that these conditions did not exist during the Crusades, to put it rather mildly.

They were, however, rather a long time ago. The Crusades were an attempt to recover for Christendom what had been lost by force, with all the accompanying massacre, pillage, and oppression that the use of force in those days implied. No one, I think, expects an apology from present-day Arabs for the imperialism of their ancestors, either as a matter of moral duty or political likelihood. We are all born into the world as we find it, after all; we are not responsible for what went before us.

Of course, we may take pride in the culture and achievements of our biological or political ancestors — indeed such pride is necessary for the preservation and development of any civilization — in which case it is only right and proper that we should also face up squarely to the less glorious aspects of our heritage. But this is a matter for genuine historical scholarship and moral reflection of the kind that leads to a determination never to repeat the crimes, not for sound-bite sloganeering. The world would be a better place if academics in the Islamic world faced up to the fact (and were free to face up to the fact) that their religion does not have a peaceful historical record, just as the world has become a better place because the Germans have acknowledged the recent historical record of their country. If large numbers of Germans, including their leaders, started to say that Germany is what it has always been, namely a land of peace, the rest of the world would have good cause to tremble.

But official apologies for distant events, however important or pregnant with consequences those events may have been, are another matter entirely. They have bad effects on both those who give them and those who receive them.

The effect on the givers is the creation of a state of spiritual pride. Insofar as the person offering the apology is doing what no one has done before him, he is likely to consider himself the moral superior of his predecessors. He alone has had the moral insight and courage to apologize.

On the other hand, he knows full well that he has absolutely no personal moral responsibility for whatever it is that he is apologizing for. In other words, his apology brings him all kudos and no pain.

This inevitably leads to the false supposition that the moral life can be lived without the pain of self-examination. The locus of moral concern becomes what others do or have done, not what one does oneself. And a good deed in the form of an apology in public for some heinous wrong in the distant past gives the person who makes it a kind of moral capital, at least in his own estimation, against which he can offset his expenditure of vice.

The habit of public apology for things for which one bears no personal responsibility changes the whole concept of a virtuous person, from one who exercises the discipline of virtue to one who expresses correct sentiment. The most virtuous person of all is he who expresses it loudest and to most people. This is a debasement of morality, not a refinement of it. The end result is likely to be self-satisfaction and ruthlessness accompanied by unctuous moralizing, rather than a determination to behave well.

The effect on some of the recipients of such apologies is likely to be very bad also, for similar though slightly different reasons. Let us take the demand for an apology for the Atlantic slave trade as an example.

I doubt whether anyone could be found nowadays who would mount a moral defense of that trade. That it was hideous and cruel beyond all description hardly needs saying, and what does not need saying should not be said, at least not often, for otherwise the lady doth protest too much.

The demand for an apology supposes that there is a clearly definable person, or group of persons, who can be held responsible for the trade, or at the very least to have been the beneficiaries of it. In other words, the world can be neatly divided into historical oppressed and oppressor, victim and perpetrator.

Most historical situations and their consequences are more complex and ambiguous than this simple schema would suggest, and the slave trade is no exception. For medical reasons having to do with relative immunity to malaria, if for no others, the supply of slaves depended crucially on the co-operation of African suppliers who captured slaves for sale. No apology from their descendents is required. The trade was abolished almost entirely through the efforts of white abolitionists. However discontented with their lot present-day American descendents of slaves may be, they are much better off than they would have been had their ancestors not been brought to America. Are they morally obliged, then, to offer up thanks to the slave traders who brought their ancestors to America?

Thus the demand for an apology for the Atlantic slave trade is a demand that people with no personal responsibility for it apologize to people who have suffered no personal wrong from it. From the point of view of morality, this is a very strange demand.

It isn’t very difficult to discern what lies behind it: money, and lots of it. Nor does it require extraordinary powers of prediction or foresight to know who would get the lion’s share of any such money that was forthcoming.

But even when money is not involved, there are deleterious effects on the recipients of what one might call class-action apologies. Just as those who give them become convinced of their own virtue, so do those who receive them. It is enough that they should be considered victims for them to conclude that they can do no wrong, or at any rate no wrong worth talking about. For what is a personal peccadillo to set beside a great historical wrong?

An apology of this kind, then, or even the supposition that such an apology ought to be forthcoming, exerts a liberating, that is to say loosening, effect upon personal morals. For what can I do wrong to compare with the wrongs that my ancestors suffered at the hands of your ancestors? How dare you even mention it, you hypocrite!

The neat division of populations into victims and perpetrators, oppressed and oppressors, sinners and saints, that public apologies for long-past wrongs both imply and strengthen means that all sense of human tragedy is lost. The situation of the Aborigines in Australia, however, was and is tragic, and would still be tragic even had the settlers behaved from the first in the best possible or morally ideal fashion. (It is not in human nature that they should have done so, least of all in a rough-and-ready and very young frontier society.)

There is no obvious or easy answer to the problem of a Stone Age people who come into close contact with a vastly superior material culture. Neither total assimilation nor preservation in what amounts to a living ethnographic museum is a complete or satisfactory solution; probably such a solution does not exist, which is the tragedy. But a blanket apology and the granting of group economic privileges is hardly the way to cultivate a sense of personal responsibility in a population now decimated by alcoholism and brutalized by family violence. Quite the contrary: psychologically, if not in strict logic, it will allow a man to beat his wife and blame history.

The False Apology Syndrome flourishes wherever there has been a shift in the traditional locus of moral concern. At one time, a man probably felt most morally responsible for his own actions. He was adjudged (and judged himself) good or bad by how he conducted himself toward those in his immediate circle. From its center rippled circles of ever-decreasing moral concern, of which he was also increasingly ignorant. Now, however, it is the other way round. Under the influence of the media of mass communication and the spread of sociological ways of thinking, a man is most likely to judge himself and others by the opinions he and they hold on political, social, and economic questions that are far distant from his immediate circle. A man may be an irresponsible father, but that is more than compensated for by his deep concern about global warming, or foreign policy, or the food situation in Africa.

A false apology is usually accompanied by bogus or insincere guilt, which is often confused with appropriate shame. The German chancellor, Mrs Merkel, spoke in the Knesset recently of her shame at what Germany had done: this was the correct word to use, and precisely the right sentiment for a German who shared no part of the responsibility for what had happened. Pride in the German musical tradition; shame for what Germans had done in the 1930s and ’40s.

Guilt, by its very nature, ought to be connected to responsibility; it ought, moreover, to be in proportion to the wrongdoing that is its occasion. To assume a guilt greater than the responsibility warrants is actually a form of grandiosity or self-aggrandisement. The psychological mechanism seems to be something like this: “I feel very guilty, therefore I must be very important.”

In some case, it is a substitute for importance, or for a loss of importance. Europe (or at least its intellectual class) now feels more than ever responsible for Africa, precisely because its power over it has waned. If Europe cannot feel itself responsible any longer for all that is good and progressive in Africa, such as modern medicine, roads, railways, telephone, etc., it can at least feel responsible for all that is bad in it, such as starvation, civil wars, and so forth. For it is far better, from the point of view of self-esteem, to be responsible for great evil than to be completely or even relatively unimportant. If in the process of false apologizing the participants render Africans themselves inert and inanimate, responsible themselves for nothing, or nothing very much, that is a small price to pay.

False Apology Syndrome — which is not yet found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association or the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases, tenth edition — is a therefore rich but poisonous mixture of self-importance, libertinism, condescension, bad faith, loose thinking, and indifference to the effects it has on those who are apologized to.

I am, of course, sorry if you disagree.

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9 Responses to “Theodore Dalrymple: False Apology Syndrome– I’m sorry for your sins.”

  1. expat Says:

    When are the poor Celts going to get their apology?

    Dalrymple is, as usual, brilliant. He is able to flesh out a feeling or opinion shared by many with sound intelligent arguments.

    Once again, thanks, Siggy.

  2. BackwardsBoy Says:

    How can reparations be asked for when the offending situation no longer exists? One has to wonder about the motives of those who claim they were wronged when they weren’t.
    Blame me for something I had no part in? Are we married?

  3. Headless Unicorn Guy Says:

    Apology:

    The Magical Mommy Kiss that makes Everything Right for the Poor Poor Victim.

    The Magical Mommy Kiss that transfers All Moral Superiority to the Poor Poor Victim and justifies any revenge or payback. (“It’s All His Fault! He Apologized!”)

    A man may be an irresponsible father, but that is more than compensated for by his deep concern about global warming, or foreign policy, or the food situation in Africa.

    I think I can top that, Siggy:

    How about a predatory homosexual ehebephile, but that is more than compensated by his militant anti-smoking?

    (Could you guess I live in California?)

  4. Ray Says:

    Don’t the psycologists call feeling guilty about what somebody else did guilt by proxy? Similar to Munchausen by proxy.

  5. 11B40 Says:

    Greetings:

    Moral superiority is the cocaine of the 21st Century.

  6. Norman Dale Says:

    I want to first apologize for agreeing with much but not all of what “Dalyrymple” says about apologies. I accept, nay embrace, the points he makes about the Crusades and the non-reciprocation of Islamic scholars and leaders for the vast depredations of their heyday. But when he wades into the deep waters of the Atlantic slave trade, his argument gets mixed up and, in places, dead wrong. This starts right from the point of his saying, that the cruelty “beyond all description hardly needs saying…” Au contraire, it odes need saying if for no other reasons than (a) racist attitudes against the descendants are far from extinguished and (b) there are always new cohorts of young people coming up behind old farts like me and Dalyrymple who are is considerable need of vivid descriptions of the past. Santayana was not wrong when he spoke of how we can be doomed by our ignorance of the past.

    Whether Dalyrymple’s aspersions on the motives and private benefits of apology are generally or occasionally true, the real question when apology — and its frequent accompaniment, monetary or other compensation — arise is whether the descendants of the victims continue to suffer from the legacy of whatever happened, and also, whether the descendants of the perpetrators continue to benefit. I live in British Columbia, Canada where the predominantly non-indigenous population continues to profit enormously from land that was never conquered or ceded through treaties. For the leaders, who speak for me to say that we non-Natives are sorry and, more important, that we will begin to rectify insofar as possible, old wrongs is not a matter of rhetoric but moral necessity. This, I believe is true as well in the context of the Atlantic slave trade. It’s way past pay-back time!

  7. Norman Dale Says:

    And furthermore! Sorry for two posts, but I neglected to comment on one other Dalyrymplism about the Atlantic Slave Trade that ought not to go unchallenged: this was the statement, “The trade was abolished almost entirely through the efforts of white abolitionists.”

    I realize that Dalyrymple has left himself some wiggle room with the hedge words “almost entirely” but any familiarity with the struggle for emancipation in the 19th century expoes the statement as one that insults the courage of many known and a lot more unknown African-Americans. Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, John Mercer Langston, Sam Cornish…the list is very long and, as said, many are those who fought but whose names today are lost.

    Of course, the white abolitionists had the resources (power, skills, money etc.) that were bound to make their role paramount, especially in terms of reputation if not performance. But to consign all the long-suffering brave slaves who spent their lives fighting back, to the nullity implied in Dalyrymple’s offhand remark, is pitiable. Indeed, he SHOULD be apologizing for this ill-considered generalization.

  8. Mark Allinson Says:

    Native Title

    My ancestors, for countless generations,
    Enjoyed the free possession of this land.
    Until they came, shattering our foundations
    Of culture – still we cry: this must not stand!
    Can passing centuries absolve this crime?
    Surely this theft must be redressed in time.
    They broke our hearts and mixed our blood with theirs,
    But we shall not forget our ancient race,
    And if you look you may detect the trace
    Of their presence, here, in my hair and face.

    We, my people, still await the return
    Of precious native lands we hold so dear.
    Before that day we who remember yearn
    And struggle on, yet we shall persevere.
    So let them raze those monuments of stone,
    Piled upon sacred sites of ancient bone,
    Apologize for every theft and end
    Our bondage to their language, art and law.
    Our Saxon hearts shall never rest before
    Regaining what the Normans stole by war.


  9. Brilliant exposition.


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